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Four Numbers That Explain Racial Disparities in Homeownership

Episode 4 of The Pay Check Podcast takes on the persistent inequality in one of the main sources of intergenerational wealth: homeownership. 

A map of Detroit from 1939 shows how majority-Black neighborhoods were redlined, and rated as the most risky for investment. 

A map of Detroit from 1939 shows how majority-Black neighborhoods were redlined, and rated as the most risky for investment. 

Source: University of Richmond Mapping Inequality

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Buying a home is the one of the primary ways that the average American accumulates wealth to pass down to their children. But it’s something White families have been able to capitalize on far more than Black families. You can’t understand the racial wealth gap in America without grappling with the historic federal housing policies that led to profound disparities in homeownership rates. In Episode 4 of The Pay Check, we explore what some of those impacts look like today, and delve into some of the history that led to them.

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